27 Different Types of Saws And Their Uses (With Pictures)

Saws can vary from the most simple style of cutting tool to an advanced piece of powered machinery. Depending on your job or the hobbies you're interested in, the type of saws you own or would like to own will vary dramatically. 

Anyone in the construction industry is likely to need a wide variety of saws, including those which are equipped to deal with a range of scenarios, as well as those which are designed to handle a specific task. Carpenters or anyone with a home wood workshop will need an entirely different set of saws, with some crossover.
 Different Types of Saws And Their Uses

In most cases, the shape of the saw plus the count and shape of the teeth will determine how a saw was intended to be used. Without further ado, here are 27 different types of saws, their uses, and pictures



Different Types of Hand Saws :


Back Saw


Back Saw
A backsaw is a specialized handsaw for cutting tenons (joints or grooves) in wood. The blade is rectangular, 8 to 14 inches in length, with a hardwood or plastic handle and a metal-reinforced back edge (opposite the teeth) to keep the blade from bending while cutting. There are 11 to 20 teeth, or points, per inch. Backsaws are used to cut across the wood grain similar to the larger and more flexible crosscut saw.

Backsaws can be used for simple cutoff work or to perform numerous exacting tasks, from cutting small joints to dovetails. Backsaws of smaller sizes are generally used for such purposes, including the tenon saw, dovetail saw, and the so-called gentleman’s saw.


Also Read - Best Lathe Mill Combo

Bow Saw


Bow Saw
A bow saw belongs to the family of frame saws, but differs from the other saws of the type in that it has a relatively narrow blade that allows for cutting curves. In the European tradition, one mostly finds relatively large saws, with blades of from 600 mm to 800 mm long, in the Anglo-Saxon tradition, the frame saws were almost invariably smaller, with blades of about 305 mm (12 inches).

You can use a bow saw with one hand, however using a second hand on the corner of the frame at the back of the saw helps to put more pressure downwards on the teeth of blade, forcing them into the log much better than can be done with one hand. 

Coping Saw


Coping Saw

A coping saw uses a very thin metal blade stretched on a metal frame to make turning cuts on wood, plastic, or metal depending on the blade selected. The U-shaped frame has a swiveling spigot (clip) at each end to hold the ends of the blade. A hardwood or plastic handle allows the user to turn the blade during the cut. Most coping saws have 12 to 15 teeth per inch, though coarser and finer blades are available for specialized jobs.

To safely use the coping saw, firmly hold the material in a vise or with clamps. Place the saw's central teeth on the line to be cut and push the saw in a short stroke to start the cut. Continue the cut, turning the handle and frame as needed to follow the cut line. For safety, keep hands and other objects away from the sharp teeth.

Crosscut Saw


Crosscut Saw
A crosscut saw is a specialized handsaw for manually cutting wood across the grain. Crosscut saws include a blade and a handle. The blade edge below the handle is the heel and the opposite end is the toe. The numerous cutting teeth between the heel and toe have alternating cutting edges. Each cutting tooth cuts with one edge and pushes the sawdust out with the other. Crosscut saws have 8 to 15 pointed teeth per inch.

For safety, always be aware that the teeth of a crosscut saw are sharp and pointed. Placing them point-down on an object or a body part will cut it.


Fret Saw


Fret Saw

A fret saw is very similar to a coping saw except that it has a longer frame which extends further away from the blade. a fret saw is very similar to a coping saw except that it has a longer frame which extends further away from the blade.It blade usually has between 14 and 48 teeth per inch.

Carpenters may also prefer to use an electric fretsaw, which is frequently referred to as a scroll saw. The blades on the two saws are the same, and they perform similar duties.


Japanese Saw

Japanese Saw
A Japanese saw is that the teeth point towards the handle. When in use, the cutting action is on the draw-stroke. The saw cuts as the user pulls, totally opposite to a traditional western saw. It is doubtful there was ever a decision made as to which way the saw should work. It may well be that it evolved naturally through the working practices of the Japanese carpenter.

The Japanese saws cut on the pull stroke. This pulling motion appears to be quite natural. In fact, the majority of our everyday gestures involve pulling rather than pushing motions. That is how you slice bread and tomato or cut a steak.


Keyhole Saw


A keyhole saw has a small pointed blade and a wood or plastic handle. It is useful for cutting holes in softer woods or in drywall, such as cutting a hole in a wall for a new electric switch. Most keyhole saws have a single handle to which various blades can be fitted. The blades vary in width, length, and number of teeth, or points. Blade lengths range from 5 to 15 inches, and there are 5 to 20 teeth per inch, with 8 to 10 being most common.

 To cut, move the saw forward and back carefully to follow the line.  For drywall holes, use shorter-length blades so the tip of the blade does not punch through the opposite wall. Mark the location to be cut with a pencil.


Pole Saw


Pole Saw
A pole saw is a long pole with a curved hacksaw blade that has longer teeth — better for cutting wooden branches. the name is a pretty good indication as to what it actually is. In this case, it’s definitely self-explanatory. A pole saw is a saw on the end of a pole.

A pole saws that aren’t manually powered are more or less smaller chainsaws on the end of a pole. If you’re trying to use a pole saw to chainsaw something on the ground in front of you, you’re going to have a hard time with a pole in the way.


Pruning Saw


Pruning Saw
A pruning saw is a tool with the same sharp teeth as saws used for cutting lumber. But pruning saws are intended for trimming live shrubs and trees.If the branch or trunk you want to trim is under 1.5 inches (3.81 cm.) in diameter, consider a hand pruner. If the wood is that thick or thicker, it is prudent to use a pruning saw.

Pruning saws are your choice for wood about 1.5 inches thick or more and your last resort before the very large stuff that you might only be able to do with a chainsaw. As such, they are used to cut a wide range on the large end of wood thicknesses.


Rip Cut Saw


Rip Cut Saw

A rip cut saw is used to cut hardwoods with the grain. Start by making some practice cuts with workable pieces of stock to get a feel for the speed you push the wood and the pressure needed to keep it snug against the fence. It is a term that refers to cutting a workpiece lengthwise, usually parallel to the direction of the wood grain. For example, you may need to shave off a half-inch from the length of a board.

Place the saw's central teeth on the end of the line opposite you and push the saw in a short stroke to start the cut. Once started, draw and push the saw to cut the wood along the line. When nearly done, make sure the end of the wood being cut is held and will not splinter due to the unsupported weight.


Veneer Saw


Veneer Saw
A veneer saw is design to cut on the pull stroke so the teeth point toward the handle or the user. When the saw comes from the factory, looking at the veneer saw on end, you’ll see that the teeth are square on the tips. For best performance, you’ll want to grind an angle on the tip of each tooth, beveling it on the handle side so it comes to a knife point.

If you’re taking up veneering, one of the must-have tools is a veneer saw. You’ll find that using a knife just doesn’t cut it. However, the veneer saw comes from the factory needing some tune up.


Drywall Saw


Drywall Saw
A drywall saw, also referred to as a plasterboard or jab saw, has a long pointed blade with a curved handle.It looks very similar to a compass saw except that it has a shorter blade and usually has fewer teeth per inch. It is a type of board made from gypsum plaster and plywood and usually sandwiched between sheets of paper. It is most commonly used to make interior walls and ceilings.

As drywall is generally used as an underlay, and not likely to be on show, a drywall saw is not designed to produce a neat finish.As a result, you do not need to worry too much about the rough and ready finish produced by the saw.

Also Read - Best CNC Machine For Small Business

Different Types of Power Saws :


Chainsaw


Chainsaw

A chainsaw has two main parts: a saw blade built into a chain, wrapped around a long metal guide bar, and a small, one-cylinder gasoline (petrol) engine (sometimes an electric motor powered by a cord or battery pack). The chain is a bit like a bicycle chain, running around sprockets (gear wheels designed to turn a chain) only with about 30 or so sharp teeth (made from a hardened steel alloy) mounted around it at intervals. 

Inside the engine, as the piston moves in and out of the cylinder, it pushes a connecting rod that turns a crankshaft. The crankshaft turns gears that are connected (through a centrifugal clutch, explained below) to one of the sprockets on which the chain is mounted—and the chain spins around.

There are rules for operating a chainsaw safely and, today, we’re going to give you the rundown, including appropriate equipment, starting methods, and proper chain and gas maintenance. 



Circular saw


Circular saw

A circular saw is an electric saw that turns a round flat blade to cut wood, metal, or plastic depending on the blade selected. Circular saws have a handle with on/off trigger switch, an arbor nut to hold the blade in place, and guards to protect the operator from touching the spinning blade. In addition, circular saws have height/depth and bevel adjustments. Refer to the circular saw's operations manual for specifics.

When ready to cut, plug the saw into an electrical outlet, firmly hold the handle, align the blade near (not touching) the mark to be cut, press the safety switch, then press the trigger switch. Slowly follow the cut mark. When nearly done, make sure the end of the wood being cut is held and will not splinter due to the unsupported weight.



Band Saw


Band Saw

Band saws are basically a pair of wheels, or occasionally three wheels, holding a thin rotating blade, a table to support the work and a motor to run it. I built my first band saw many years ago using a kit from the Gilliom Mfg. Company. The company supplied the wheels and other parts, you supplied the motor and constructed a wooden cabinet. Band saws are available in a variety of sizes, ranging from small bench-top to huge floor models.

A band saw can be used to cut curves, even in thick lumber, such as in creating cabriole legs, to rip lumber and to crosscut short pieces. The most common use for the band saw, however, is in cutting irregular shapes.


Jigsaw


Jigsaw

A jigsaw is the grand master of cutting shapes in a variety of materials. All you need is the right blade. We'll show you how to use this versatile power tool for cutting intricate shapes and for making compound and bevel cuts in boards and other materials. 

Jigsaws work best for cutting softwood that’s no more than 1-1/2 in. thick and hardwood up to 3/4 in. thick. Jigsaw blades tend to bend when cutting curves in thicker boards, leaving a beveled edge rather than a square one. To keep the cut square, use a sharp blade and avoid forcing the saw through the cut.

jigsaws are a dream to use because you can twist and turn the jigsaw to your heart's content, cutting elaborate curves without being impeded by a dangling cord or worrying about accidentally cutting it. Jigsaws used to be a bit unwieldy but the newer generation, especially the battery-powered variety, are lightweight and slim.


Miter saw



A miter saw makes really accurate cross cuts. As I just mentioned a cross cut is against the grain and parallel to the longest edge of the board. The Miter saw’s “trigger” is pulled by your fingers gripped around the handle and when the trigger depresses it fires up the motor.

Miter saw blades range in size from 7¼ inches to 12 inches. Saws can be just over 20 pounds or as heavy as 60+ pounds. There are many variables to consider, and it’s important to ensure that the saw you choose can perform the tasks that you need it to. 


Table saw


Table saw
Table saws come in many different shapes and sizes and are a valuable asset to any wood worker – whether you’re practicing the craft as part of your trade or for enjoyment.Table saws able to make your work much more clean cut and precise which makes measuring for your projects and fitting the pieces together later on a much more easy task.

However, if you are working with more sturdy or durable materials, you’ll need to invest in a device that is capable of performing heavy duty work.


Wet Tile saw


Wet Tile saw

A wet tile saw cuts tiles made of ceramic, leaving a clean, smooth edge. A tile setter needs to trim tiles at the installation site to fit the edges of a room or create inventive designs. A table-mounted, portable wet tile saw allows her to cut tile as they are needed to exact specifications. The saw combines a circular blade, similar to a wood table saw, with a water pump and hose to constantly drench the cutting area with water to reduce friction and cool the surface.

If you consider the price to just rent one at either of these places (about $50 per day), you would have to be a fool not to buy one, especially if you will be doing other projects where one might come in handy. 


Pole Saw


Pole Saw
A pole saw is a long pole with a curved hacksaw blade that has longer teeth — better for cutting wooden branches. the name is a pretty good indication as to what it actually is. In this case, it’s definitely self-explanatory. A pole saw is a saw on the end of a pole.

A pole saws that aren’t manually powered are more or less smaller chainsaws on the end of a pole. If you’re trying to use a pole saw to chainsaw something on the ground in front of you, you’re going to have a hard time with a pole in the way.


Reciprocating Saw


Reciprocating Saw

A reciprocating saw is a staple in a contractor’s inventory, with its’ compact design and power to tackle projects, ranging from DIY house repairs – to major work such as construction and demolition work.

As some reciprocating saws are made for one-handed use, this provides added versatility when making difficult cuts, with the safety of leverage.

The motor is the ‘brain’ of the reciprocating saw, powering the blade and enabling you to make cuts. Motors can be found in two forms, a traditional ‘brushed’ motor, and a ‘brushless’ motor. Brushed motors contain small brushes inside the motor.


Scroll Saw


Scroll Saw

A scroll saw is a useful power saw that is meant for making ultra-intricate cuts on pieces of wood. If you have ever seen a finely carved of wood art or wooden patterns then chances are that it was created using a scroll saw.

It is like a powered, benchtop coping saw and is often pedal operated, for hands-free, adjustable speed control. If you’re a casual DIY enthusiast, you’ve undoubtedly seen one, and most woodworker hobbyists have probably used one. 

Scroll saw size is determined by its throat. Throat size is the distance from the blade to the rear of the saw where it joins the table. The longer the throat, the larger the material you can cut.


Chop saw


Chop saw

A chop saw is similar in appearance to a circular saw. Most woodworkers or cabinetmakers use chop saws to make precise square cuts as they are working. There are some types of chop saws that can also be used to make bevel or angled cuts. When such features are available, the saws are typically called miter saws. 

It  is a power tool that used to make straight cuts in wood. It may have features that allow it to cut angles, which makes it a miter saw.The size of the blade allows carpenters to cut several thicknesses of wood. Special blades will also allow the chop saw to cut metal.


Also Read - Best Wet Tile Saw Under $300

Compound Miter Saw


Compound Miter Saw

A compound miter saw is widely-regarded as the most accurate tool for making crosscuts on wood, whether those cuts are square, angled or beveled. In many cases, these saws will allow the user to angle and bevel the cut at the same time, creating precise yet complex compound cuts. This is particularly useful when cutting crown molding and other materials that require extremely accurate angled cuts. 

It can make the same basic cuts that a standard miter saw can, but it is best for bevel cuts. The compound miter saw has more versatility than the standard miter saw.  The dual bevel will allow compound cuts in both directions without having to flip around the board you are cutting. With the more advanced features of a compound miters saw you could be looking at spending a bit more money with this option.


Panel Saw


Panel Saw
A panel saw is a broad generalization which describes any saw that can cut wood into sheets or specifically sized parts. A panel saw can be found in various sizes from small table models to large floor models meant for very large projects. A panel saw can also be found in two different orientations: horizontal and vertical. The following article will share with you some of the better uses of a panel saw.

The panel saw is typically used to cut large sheets of foam, wood, or acrylic into smaller sheets for use on the laser cutter and CNC. Due to comparably large tolerance of ~1/16 inch, it main purpose is to cut large pieces of material into more workable sizes.


Oscillating Saw


Oscillating Saw

An oscillating saw generally comes in the form of a multi-faceted multi-tool. It always includes the small oscillating saw. Like an oscillating fan, the saw is powered to move back and forth.

It generally also comes with tools for sanding and polishing. It can be used to trim pipes and wood among a variety of other tasks.


Radial Arm Saw


Radial Arm Saw

Radial-arm saws are heavy, bulky machines that typically are not very portable. They are also fairly expensive and are somewhat difficult to keep in alignment. All these factors make them more common in dedicated wood shops, where portability isn't a concern and the owners can master their use. While it is mainly a crosscut saw, this tool can be used to rip.

The radial-arm saw is the perfect tool for cross-cutting dadoes and rabbets, particularly when making tenons or slots for shelf standards. Raise the blade away from the table and install your stacked dado set to the thickness desired, making certain to install it in the proper direction for the rotation of the blade.





Post a Comment

0 Comments